jul 182013
 

Executive Summary History The Special Demonstration Squad (SDS) was an undercover unit formed by the Metropolitan Police’s Special Branch. It operated between 1968 and 2008, during which time it infiltrated and reported on groups concerned in violent protest. Operation Herne Operation Herne (formerly Soisson) was formed in October 2011 in response to allegations made by the Guardian newspaper about alleged misconduct and criminality engaged in by members of the SDS. Similar matters had been previously aired as early as 2002 [lees verder]

jul 182013
 

The identities of 42 dead children whose names were assumed by undercover police officers will not be revealed to their relatives, according to a report. The Metropolitan Police offered a general apology for the “shock and offence” the practice had caused. But Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said revealing the identities used would endanger the officers concerned. The senior officer who wrote the report on the 1980s practice told MPs it would not be used as a tactic today. The report’s [lees verder]

jul 182013
 

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe releases report on surveillance used since 1970s but refuses to inform any affected families Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said families of dead children whose identities were used would not be approached, as that could put undercover officers in danger. Photograph: John Stillwell/PA Britain’s most senior police officer has offered a general apology for the “morally repugnant” theft of dead children’s identities by undercover spies who infiltrated political groups. But Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Metropolitan police commissioner, has refused to [lees verder]

jul 182013
 

Bob Lambert admits to adopting the identity of a seven-year-old boy and has conceded to having four affairs while undercover Bob Lambert was deployed as an animal rights activist named Bob Robinson in the 1980s. A former police spymaster has claimed the practice of resurrecting the identities of dead children so they could be used by undercover officers was “well known at the highest levels of the Home Office”. Bob Lambert, who is facing a potential criminal investigation over his [lees verder]

jul 182013
 

Bob Lambert had a five-year covert career using the alias Bob Robinson The married office slept with four women and fathered a child with one Lambert claims that being undercover led to his bad behaviour Back in the day: During a covert career in which he infiltrated various groups, Bob Lambert has spoke of his disgust at some of his actions A former Scotland Yard police officer who fathered a child with one of several targets he had relationships with [lees verder]

jul 182013
 

Investigation into covert policing has found widespread use of the practice. Senior police leaders are set to make an unprecedented national apology after hundreds of names of dead children were used to create false identities for undercover officers. An investigation into covert policing has found widespread use of the practice. Undercover officers told The Times that they were trained to use names of the dead and it had become “standard practice”. Special branch units used the names while infiltrating criminal [lees verder]

jul 182013
 

Police chiefs are expected to formally apologise for using the names of dead children to create fake identities for undercover officers. It had been thought that only officers in secret police units such as the Met Police’s Special Demonstration Squad, which was closed in 2008, had adopted dead children’s names as a new identity. But Operation Herne, an ongoing investigation into the conduct of undercover police, has revealed that the practice was more widespread than originally thought and used by [lees verder]

mrt 082013
 

The story of Bob Lambert reveals just how far police may have gone to infiltrate political groups The grave of Mark Robinson and his parents in Branksome cemetery in Poole, Dorset. Bob Lambert adopted the boy’s identity, abbreviating his second name to Bob. Photograph: Roger Tooth for the Guardian The words inscribed on the grave say Mark Robinson “fell asleep” on 19 October, 1959. He was a seven-year-old boy who died of a congenital heart defect, the only child to [lees verder]

feb 152013
 

Met police’s deputy assistant commissioner admits to Commons committee that both units broke internal guidelines Keith Vaz, chairman of the Commons home affairs committee, criticised the Met police for not apologising for the ‘gruesome’ practice. Photograph: Linda Nylind for the Guardian Police chiefs have admitted that a second undercover unit stole the identities of dead children in the late 1990s or even more recently in a series of operations to infiltrate political activists. Growing evidence of the scale of the [lees verder]