apr 102013
 

Claims over Patrice Lumumba’s 1961 assassination made by Labour peer in letter to London Review of Books Ben Quinn Congo premier Patrice Lumumba waves in New York in July 1960 after his arrival from Europe. Photograph: AP Congo’s first democratically elected prime minister was abducted and killed in a cold war operation run by British intelligence, according to remarks said to have been made by the woman who was leading the MI6 station in the central African country at the [lees verder]

apr 102013
 

British spies admitted helping to organise the detention and execution of the first prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo in the 1960s, a peer has claimed. British spies admitted helping to organise the detention and execution of Patrice Lumumba the first prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo in the 1960s, a peer has claimed. Photo: AP Baroness (Daphne) Park of Monmouth, who was the senior MI6 officer in the African country at the time, said she [lees verder]

apr 102013
 

Patrice Lumumba was the first democratically elected Prime Minister of Congo AFP/Getty Images MI6 should open its archives to reveal the truth behind Britain’s alleged involvement in the assassination of African leader Patrice Lumumba in the 1960s, the author of a new book on intelligence said yesterday. … Michael Evans, Francis Elliott and Charles Bremner Last updated at 12:25AM, April 3 2013 Find this story at 3 April 2013 © Times Newspapers Limited 2013

apr 102013
 

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Patrice Lumumba, the first democratically elected leader of what is now known as the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Lumumba’s pan-Africanism and his vision of a united Congo gained him many enemies. Both Belgium and the United States actively sought to have him killed. The CIA ordered his assassination but could not complete the job. Instead, the United States and Belgium covertly funneled cash and aid to rival politicians who [lees verder]

apr 102013
 

It’s pretty obvious why British governments have been anxious to keep the history of their secret service secret for so long. In the case of decolonisation, which is the subject of Calder Walton’s book, revelations about dirty tricks even after fifty years might do irreparable damage to the myth carefully cultivated at the time: which was that for Britain, unlike France, say, or the Netherlands, or Belgium, the process was smooth and friendly. Britain, so the story went, was freely [lees verder]